Harry And Landra Reid To Move To Las Vegas Area

Harry and Landra Reid will move closer to children and grandchildren in Las Vegas

They will sell Searchlight property that their home is on to allow development
of Searchlight mine

Harry and Landra Reid will continue to own other Searchlight property

Harry and Landra Reid today announced they are moving to the Las Vegas area to be closer to their children and grandchildren living in Southern Nevada. They have sold approximately 110 acres of land in Searchlight, including their home, to Nevada Milling and Mining for development of a gold mine in Searchlight. Along with the purchase of the home and surrounding land, Nevada Milling and Mining has also purchased eight mining claims along with the mineral and water rights on the property.

“Landra and I love Searchlight, the place of my birth, and the memories we have had there, but the time came to sell and do something different,” said Senator Reid. “We want to be closer to our 16 grandchildren who live in Southern Nevada, and be able to spend time with them. This is why we will now purchase a residence in the Las Vegas area. Searchlight will always remain my home, my favorite spot in the world where I can look at the quiet desert for miles at end.”

Once thought to be long past its Gold Dust days, Searchlight has seen a renewed interest in gold mining amid new technologies. In 2012, Nevada Milling and Mining purchased the Coyote Mine in Searchlight to mine for gold and for other underground exploration.

Harry and Landra Reid have resided in their homes in Searchlight for 25 years. Over the recent years there have been mining operations conducted close to their home and this operation was too close. They are currently looking and will purchase a home in Southern Nevada to be closer to their 4 children and 16 grandchildren currently residing in the Las Vegas area.

The Reids were approached by Nevada Milling and Mining last year about selling their property, and with it their home, in order for the mine to operate. Nevada Milling and Mining acquired the land for water rights, mineral rights, buffering and future opportunities. The mine will create approximately 60 new jobs in Searchlight and bring economic development to the region according to the company. The eight mining claims purchased by Nevada Milling and Mining are as follows:

  • Pan American
  • Telluride
  • Santa Fe
  • Birdie
  • Elvira
  • Mesa
  • Parrot
  • Oro Flame

In a separate sale, Harry and Landra Reid sold two other mining claims in Searchlight, the Dubuque and Cushman, to American Capital Energy (ACE).

Searchlight has been a mining town for over a century. It is located over an hour’s drive, about 60 miles, from Las Vegas, with little but scenic Nevada landscape and millions of solar panels in between. The Reid’s family history in Nevada goes back to around the turn of the 20th century when Reid’s grandfather and grandmother, John and Harriet Reid, came to Searchlight. Their names are mentioned several times in early Searchlight newspapers. Harry Reid, Senator Reid’s father, was a hard-rock miner. In his book, The Good Fight, Reid writes about his father:

“Even with the physical risk, and the toll on his body, my dad loved being a miner. He loved it because he was good at it, and because he was more content battling the earth than being around people…my father was born to mine, and it was the only thing he wanted to do.”

Reid’s love of his hometown is well documented. In 1998 he authored his first book, Searchlight: The Camp That Didn’t Fail, the most comprehensive history of the town to date. In the book’s foreword, former Nevada Governor Mike O’Callaghan, Reid’s mentor and high school teacher, writes:

“I don’t know where Harry’s political future will take him, but I do know the lessons he learned in Searchlight – lessons about handling adversity, confronting a harsh and extreme environment, and facing challenges with courage and principle – will provide the foundation for his life’s work. That’s why this historical tribute to Searchlight is so important; it gives insight into the man who wrote it.”

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